Crocheting the edging and filling the gaps..

chain 2

 

Once you’ve finished the crocheting the chain loops around the circumference of your shawl (or whatever else you may care to make) it’s time to work into those little foundation loops and build up your crocheted edge.  I find it much easier to once again place stitch markers into position around the sections where there is a straight edge before it goes in and out or zigzagedy.

Working up from where you previously slip stitched the last foundation chain, chain 2 and then make 2 single crochet stitches under the first chain loop.

 

chain along

 

In the next little loop make 3 sc, and then 3 more in the last loop.

When you come to the edge of the half hexagon, make 2 sc stitches under each loop (there are 8 loops along the length of the half hexagon so you’ll be making 8 lots of 2 sc stitches.

 

corner one

 

When you get to the end of the first section of straight edge, make your last 2 sc and then chain 1 and then work the following pattern.

Under the first loop, make 1 sc, then 2 half double crochet stitches.

 

zigzag

 

Under the second loop, make 1 hdc and then 2 double crochet stitches.

 

joining tripel

 

Under the third loop work 1 double crochet, and then work one half treble stitch (wrap the yarn around the hook twice, insert the hook, wrap the yarn around and pull through, you’ll have 4 stitches on your hook, yarn over hook and pull it through 2 stitches leaving 3 stitches on your hook.  Yarn over the hook and pull it through 2 stitches on your hook.  Yarn over again and pull it through the last 2 stitches on your hook)…….

 

into next hexagon

 

Now go to make a second htr stitch, yarn over the hook twice, insert the hook under the chain, scoop the yarn through under the chain and through the first two stitches on your hook….now insert the hook under the chain of the next hexagon, scoop yarn through the first two stitches on the hook, then scoop yarn round the hook and through the next two stitches on the hook, and finally scoop the yarn round and through the final two stitches on the hook.  This makes a stitch that has two legs which closes the gap between the two hexagons.

 

filling it

 

Now work the pattern in reverse, under the first loop make a htr stitch and then a double stitch.

 

sc into tip

 

Under the second loop make 2 double stitches and then a half double stitch.

Under the third loop which will bring you up nicely to the top of the hexagon, make 2 hd stitches and finish with a sc.

Repeat along the zigzag edge until you come to the start of the straight edge.

 

work to stitch marker

 

When you come to the start of the straight edge (which is shown above with a stitch marker), make the last stitch in pattern (which is a single crochet stitch) and then make 1 chain before working the sc along and under the loops as at the start.

 

point one

 

When you reach the tip of the first tail of the shawl, make the last single crochet, then chain 1……

 

chaining point

 

and then make a sc between the two single crochet stitches of the previous round, make another 1 chain …….

 

work zigzag to point

 

and then you are working the “fill in the gap” pattern again so make a sc, followed by 2 hdc under the first loop, then a hdc and 2 dc stitches under the second loop and so on……

 

work down to neckline

 

Work this little pattern all the way down the inside tail of the shawl ……

 

working the neckline

 

When you reach the neckline work 2sc stitches under each loop until you reach the first loop of the first half hexagon….

 

neckline

 

Under the eight loop make 2hdc.  Make 2hdc under loop one of the joining half hexagon and then work 2dc 6 more times…..

When you reach the eight loop, once again make 2hdc and another 2hdc under the first loop of the next half hexagon.

 

neckline worked

 

Continue around like so…..making 2 dc under each loop apart from the first and last loop under which you make 2hdc stitches.

When you reach the last half hexagon, make 2 dc under the eight loop.

 

second point

 

Continue in pattern up to the second tail end of the shawl, working the “fill in the gap” pattern as you go…….

When you reach the tip, once again make the final single crochet on the inside, then 1 chain, a sc between the two sc of the previous round, chain 1 and then continue in pattern down the other side……

 

straight edge

 

Continue working along the edge, making 2 sc under each loop of the half hexagon, and 3 sc under the loops of the whole hexagon.

 

little gap

 

Between two straight edges you have a a single zigzag, fill in the little gap with the same pattern of sc, 2hdc, hdc etc….. make sure to chain 1 either end as they are the start and finish of straight edges.

 

finished

 

Continue all the way around and then slip stitch home into the second link of the first chain you made.

 

I use UK terminology throughout….. but if you prefer the American then that is as follows….

A UK single crochet (sc) is an American double crochet (dc)

A UK half double crochet (hdc) is an American half treble (htr)

A Uk double crochet (dc) is an American treble (tr) and finally ….

A UK half treble (htr) is an American double treble (dtr)

 

These are links to the previous tutorials for making the shawl.

Finished shawl

half hexagons

joining the half hexagons into the missing gaps

chaining along

 

If you would like to know how to make the grannies paperweight crochet (it’s also called African Flower) then please go here as Heidi gives a wonderful tutorial, she also shows how to join them.

Chaining along….

 

stitch marker

 

Apologies in advance as this is a rather heavy photo post and I probably explain things far too much and unintentionally make it sound harder (it’s just when I first started crocheting I found it really difficult if I wasn’t told exactly what I needed to do…hope that makes sense)

When I worked the edging on my shawl I found it easiest to mark off the sections of “straight” and “zigzag” with stitch markers at the start and end of each section of “straight”…this helped me know where I was and when I needed to make an extra chain.

You want to start the edging in the 6th hexagon round from the front (I start here because the join will be covered as this is in the middle and when it is draped around your neck is covered by the shawl’s tails and also your hair.)  I’ve marked the spot with a stitch marker.

 

insert hook

 

Insert your hook (I’m using a 3.25mm one) into the corner gap of the brown trimmed hexagon and make a chain, scoop yarn through the gap and then scoop it through the 2 stitches that are on your hook.  (this is your foundation sc) Then chain 3……and count along 3 of the dc which form the edge of the bottom hexagon, and insert the hook between the 3rd and 4th stitch, make a sc, and then chain 3 again.

Insert your hook between the 6th and 7th dc and make a sc.  Finally chain another 3 and insert the hook in the corner gap of the hexagon, and sc.

 

work along edge

 

Now you are working along the edge of the half hexagon.  This time you are inserting your hook just under the two loops of the stitch on the edge.

 

half hexagon

 

Chain 2 stitches and then carefully count 3 of the stitches of the half hexagon, insert your hook and make a sc.  Chain 2 more and once again count 3 of the stitches before inserting the hook.  Work along to the corner where you make your final sc.  In all you want to make 8 little chains of 2 stitches.

 

zig zag

 

Repeat using 3 chains and count along 3 of the dc stitches of the joining whole hexagon, insert the hook in the gap between the 3rd and 4th dc and make a sc, continue chaining 3 and inserting the hook every 3rd dc and making a sc along the side of the whole hexagon.

At the finish of side 1 make a sc, then chain 1 before making a second sc in to the gap before chaining 3 and then counting along 3 dc on the next side of the green trimmed hexagon.

Work down to the inverted corner(between the blue and green hexagons) and make a sc each side but do not make a chain between them.

 

work to stitch counter

 

Work up to the tip of the hexagon, chain 3 and make a sc into the gap.  As this is part of the zigzag section, do not make a chain and do not make a second sc, but instead chain 3 and continue to work down the side joining the orange hexagon. Continue in pattern up to the tip of the orange hexagon, as this is the start of the straight section, make your sc, chain 1 and then make a second sc to begin your next set of chain 3.

 

work the poiint

 

Continue working up to the tail of the shawl.  As you are crocheting along a half hexagon you are making 2 chains and inserting the hook just underneath the 3rd stitch along (making 8 little chain loops in total)  When you reach the point, insert the hook and make a sc then make 1 chain and insert the hook to make a second sc.

 

around the point

 

Then you rotate your work, chain 3 and sc into the gap between the 3rd and 4th dc of the edge.

 

along the zig zag

 

Continue to crochet along the zigzags formed by the shape of the hexagons.

As this is part of the zigzag section do not make the chain 1 at the top of the hexagons.

 

work neckline

 

When you reach the inside neckline (which is shaped of 5 half hexagons with a whole hexagon either end) work around in pattern which will be 3 chains for the whole hexagons and 2 chains for the half hexagons.

Make your 3 chains and insert the hook in the gap of the brown hexagon make a sc then chain 3 and insert hook 2 stitches along in the half hexagon.  Continue around the neckline like so.

 

inside the neckline

 

When you make the sc in the inverted corners, insert the hook into the gap where 3 hexagons meet, make a sc and then continue to chain 2 and insert the hook under the 3rd stitch along.

 

second point

 

Work up to the second tail,  sc, chain 1 at the tip and then make a second sc before working along the half hexagon making 2 chains and sc into the 3rd stitch as you go along.

 

sc and chain

 

Continue working along the top straight section of crochet, chaining 3 and inserting the hook and making a sc.

 

chain at corner

 

Each time you come to the end of a section of straight crochet, remember to chain 1, and make the second sc before chaining 3.

 

continue working

 

Continue working around the edge of the shawl, chain 3 and insert the hook in to the gap between the 3rd and 4th dc and making a sc.

The red edged hexagon in the above picture is actually the bottom most hexagon of the shawl, it’s a very short piece of straight crochet so remember to make a chain and the two sc stitches at it’s corners.

(whoops I actually made a mistake at this point….. You can see I’ve just made a second sc in the tip of the green hexagon….you don’t want to do this as it is part of the zigzag section, one sc is plenty!)

 

slip stitch home

 

Continue working round the shawl and then slip stitch home in the chain you began.

Do not cut yarn as you will now be working into the chain loops to create the edging.

 

These are UK terminologies (a UK single crochet is an American dc and a UK double crochet is an American Treble ( or if you are into Star Trek…a Tribble crochet)

These chain loops are used as a foundation for you to crochet your edging on.   The same technique can be used to straighten out a grannies paperweight blanket.

 

Grannies paperweight crochet shawl….

shawl with jacket

 

After more fannying and pfaffing than I thought possible, I’ve finally finished a winter shawl using the grannies paperweight crochet motif (it’s also called African flower but I prefer the granny name)……  it’s a bit scratchy and stiff still at the moment but on the whole I’m pretty pleased with the result.

 

shawl wrapped

 

It’s made up of whole and half hexagons, and then I’ve edged it with a super soft wool from my local yarn shop (I used Artesano DK alpaca.  It’s as soft and wispy as a cloud)   It’s wonderfully warm and I’m sitting here wearing it feeling somewhat on the verge of a hot flush (I’m not really complaining, I’m one of those people who feels chilly in August).

Apart from the fancy wool edging, the whole shawl is made from tapestry wool (most of which came from antiquey and charity shops)….. I love the incredible range of colours that opens up to use (I really think this pattern comes into it’s own when you use as wide a range of colours as possible…..it takes me back to when I was little and would buy quarters of sweeties from the village shop….there used to be a sweet called fair rock which I don’t think is made anymore, but it looked the same as this pattern)  the only down side to using a different colour for each and every row is there are an awful lot of tails to sew in when you’ve finished crocheting, but I think the end results are pretty fine.

 

crochet the hexagons

 

To make a shawl, start by crocheting your hexagons together (the best tutorial I found to make and join these was lovely Heidi’s)  You’ll need to make 32 whole hexagons and then 13 half hexagons.  I like to make my hexagons a bit smaller and so prefer to join them together on the fifth round.  Also I use a 4mm hook for the first 3 rounds then change to a 3.25mm for rounds 4 and 5.

I wrote about how I made half hexagons the other week so rather than repeat myself, the links to those are here….this is how I make my half hexagons and this is how I join them in.

I found it easier to make the shape of the shawl with the whole hexagons first and then fitted in the half hexagons afterwards (it’s a bit like making a jigsaw puzzle).

 

laid out

 

When you join them together you are looking to make a shape that curves around and overlaps in the centre.  (when I first crocheted this up I’d made it a bit too big at the front so I then had to unpick the edge at the front which is why that bottom row of hexagons has a slightly wiggly look*)

 

edge shape

 

And this shows how the point of the shawl is shaped  (it’s a bit hard to see on the first picture as the colours all blend in together)…..

 

joined hexagons

 

I just wanted to show a picture of the *original shawl (or the crochet that I had to unpick that I mentioned at the top)…… it looked fine but when I tried it on while I was working the edge, it looked too much like a bib for a baby and it also stuck out over my shoulders…..

 

These are the links you need to make the basic shape of the shawl.

Heidi’s hexagons

Heidi’s hexagons join as you go

My half hexagons

Joining my half hexagons into the missing gaps

Chaining around

Crocheting the edge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joining in the missing half hexagons to your Grannies Paperweight….

half hexagon

 

Once you’ve crocheted the first four rounds of your Grannie’s Paperweight, it’s time to join it in to the half hexagon gap that the whole hexagons form along the top and bottom..

I’m using UK terminology  (however if you are more familiar with American patterns then a UK single crochet is an American double, and a UK double crochet is an American treble) …. and many apologies because this is a bit of a photo heavy post.

For joining in the fifth round I use a 3.25 mm crochet hook (I like the Brittany wooden ones as their point is nice and sharp and fits into the stitches without snagging up on them) and prefer a slightly finer tapestry yarn so the vintage brands like Penelope, and Coats are perfect (as is the Elsa Williams US brand, that’s so lovely it seems to work brilliantly for all the rounds)

 

chain 3

 

Make a slip knot, insert your hook into the bottom chain of your half hexagon, wrap the yarn round the hook, pull through the stitch of the hexagon and then through the stitch on the hook.  Chain 3.

 

joining in

 

Now insert the hook into the bottom corner of the hexagon to the right, bring the yarn over the hook, and scoop it through the gap, your hook will now be laying on the front of your work, pull the yarn through the stitch on your hook to secure it. Now make a dc into the top stitch of the half hexagon next to the chain of 3.  And then make another dc.

 

joining 1st segment

 

Now count along 3 of the dc in the hexagon to the right and in the gap between 3rd and 4th gap, insert the hook, bring the yarn through, then through the stitch on the hook to secure.

 

second segment

 

Now make 3 dc in the half hexagon, and again count along 3 of the dc in the hexagon you are joining it to, insert the hook between the 6th and 7th stitch, and again yarn over the hook, pull it through and then pull the yarn through the stitch on the hook.

 

insert hook

 

Make one more set of 3 dc in the half hexagon and then insert the hook into the corner gap of the hexagon you are joining in to, wrap the yarn around the hook and pull it up through the gap.

 

insert into second gap

 

Now insert the hook into the corner gap of the next hexagon that the half hexagon is being joined to, scoop up the yarn and pull it up through the gap.

 

yarn over

 

Bring the yarn through the stitch on the hook and now work 3 dc along the next side of your half hexagon.  (the first sc stitch you are working into is the same one you ended on along the previous side)

Join like before, insert the hook between the 3rd and 4th dc of the whole hexagon, pull the yarn through the gap and then through the stitch on the hook. Continue all the way around, joining the second corner the same way as you joined the first corner.

 

insert hook in last stitch

 

When you reach the bottom, make 3 dc like you have been doing through the tops of the sc, insert your hook into the bottom gap of the whole hexagon on the left, scoop the yarn and pull it through the gap,  and then through the stitch that is on the hook and make 1 chain.

 

finishing third side

 

Now you need to work a row of sc stitches along the raw edge of your work.

I find the pointy end of the Brittany hook makes this a lot easier than using a plastic crochet hook.

 

double crochet along edge

 

 

You want to work though the centre of the stitches that are formed by working the chains at either end or your groups of stitches.

 

 

carry on double crochet

 

I find I need to make about 18 sc along the raw edge (between 16 and 19, it depends a bit on the thickness of the wool and how stretchy it is…anymore than that and the side goes all bulgy like a fat little tummy)

 

slip stitch

 

When I come almost to the end, rather than make a sc as the last stitch, I insert the hook into the stitch that joins the half hexagon to the whole one, and pull the yarn though the stitch and then through the stitch on the hook (basically making a slip stitch) before cutting the yarn and pulling that through to cast off.

 

filled in gap

 

That then fills in the gap between your hexagons.  When I then sew in the tails (of which there are a never ending amount for this pattern) I try to avoid sewing them in along the finished edge because when you then come to crocheting an edging or border, it becomes a bit harder to insert the hook.

If, at first, this row looks a bit lumpy and bumpy, it’s not a stress to unravel it and crochet it again.  (besides, once the border edging is worked that helps smooths out any unsightly odd bits)

 

 

 

 

Crocheting a half hexagon for a Grannies Paperweight …..

stretchy

 

I think I love the Grannies Paperweight ( also known as African Flower) crochet pattern more than any other, it reminds me of sweeties that I used to buy when I was little, mixed in with patchwork quilts and those cardboard kaleidoscopes that seemed very popular in the seventies……however I really struggled initially with the half hexagons, they just seemed more fiddlesome to make than the whole hexagons (and as a rule I’m a girl who generally likes fiddly) however I wasn’t happy with leaving those up and down tops and bottoms, and knew for some other projects I’ve been working on that I really needed to sort out how to make the straight edges.

After much pfaffing, un-ravelling, tutting and endless cups of tea……I finally came up with a method I was pleased with…..so this is how I make a half hexagon to fit in with a Grannies Paperweight hexagon.  (apologies in advance as this is a bit of a photo heavy post)

The Grannies Paperweight blanket (which is being “inspected” in the top picture by my fat and furry assistant) was made using mostly vintage (but some was new) tapestry wool.  I prefer to use tapestry wool as that has such an amazing array of colour, all those subtle variations in hue and tone is mind blowing which I think just looks beautiful for this particular pattern……also for the first three rounds I use a 4mm Clover soft touch crochet hook, then for the fourth and fifth round I use a Brittany 3.25mm hook.  I just find those final rounds work better using a smaller hook size (and the Brittany hook is nice and pointy so slips into the stitches without snagging).

This is written with UK terminology.  (if you are used to using American terminology, then a UK single crochet is an American double crochet, and a UK double is an American treble.)

 

first colour ring

 

First make a slip knot, make 4 chains and join them together with a slip stitch. Make another 3 chains and then make 2 double (d/c) through the centre of the ring. Then make 1 chain, and make another 2 d/c.  Make another 1 chain and yet another 2 d/c and finally chain 3.  Put the hook through the centre of the ring and make a slip stitch before cutting the yarn and pulling the yarn through the stitch on the hook.

 

first ring finished

 

This gives you 3 sets of 2 d/c with a row of 3 chains at either end.  I like to leave tails of about 4 inches so I can sew the tails in nice and securely.

 

joining first colour

 

Next it’s time for your second colour, start off with a slip knot and insert the hook in the space between the first row of 3 chains and the first group of 2 d/c.  Slip stitch the yarn through the stitch on the hook so the yarn is held in position, chain 4, and then make 2 d/c all in the same gap.

 

working round second colour

 

Now make 2 d/c, 1 chain and 2 more 2 d/c in the next gap.  Repeat in the third gap so you are working your way round the  half circle shape.

 

finishing second colour

 

In the fourth gap, make 2 d/c and chain 3, insert the hook back into the gap, pull the yarn through, make a slip stitch, cut the yarn and then pull through the stitch which is left on the hook.

You now have a little trapezoid shape.

 

starting third colour

 

Now you need to join your third colour.  Make a slip knot and insert the hook and make a slip stitch, and then chain 3.   Now make 3 d/c stitches all in the gap between the 4 chains and the 2 d/c stitches of the previous row.

 

working round third colour

 

In the second gap you need to make 7 d/c stitches.  Make another 7 stitches in the third gap.

 

finishing third colour

 

In the fourth gap you need to make 3 d/c stitches and then chain 3, bring the hook through the same gap and make a slip stitch, cut the yarn and then pull the yarn through the remaining stitch on the hook.

 

starting fourth colour

 

For the fourth round I prefer to use a smaller hook so am now using a 3.25 mm hook.

Make a slip knot and insert the hook into the top of the stitch of the previous round. (you are putting the hook into the 3rd chain)  and you are not working under the stitch but into the actual stitch itself.

Pull the yarn through for a slip stitch and then make 1 chain.

 

working fourth colour

 

Continue working in the top of the stitches and make a d/c in the top of the next 3 stitches.  (with the chain you’ll have made 4 stitches).  Now you make a d/c stitch right down through the pair of s/c in the second row.  (yarn over, put the hook through, scoop the yarn and pull it through and up to the row you are working on.  Scoop the yarn through the hook and pull it through the first two stitches on your hook, scoop the yarn again and pull it through the remaining two stitches).  Make another 7 s/c stitches (squish back the d/c stitch a little as I find that often wants to hide the first stitch), make another d/c.  Repeat to make another 7 s/c stitches and another d/c.

 

finished fourth colour

 

Finish by making 3 s/c, then insert hook into the final stitch, scoop yarn through that stitch, and then through the stitch on your hook.  (slip stitch)  Cut the yarn and pull it through the stitch to cast off.

This is your finished half hexagon.   I prefer to work my whole hexagon with 4 rounds and join them on the fifth round, and find sewing in the tails easier once the half hexagon has been joined into position.

I’ll explain how to join them in tomorrow.

 

Regarding tapestry wool, my favourite brand is an American one called Elsa Williams (I bought some on ebay and it is lovely) I find DMC the best for the first two or three rounds then tend to use Anchor, Penelope , Playtime, Coats and other vintage brands for the fourth or fifth round.

It’s much easier to follow this if you are already familiar with making the Grannies Paperweight whole hexagon.  If you aren’t then I think the best tutorial is this one here at Heidi Bears.