Joining in the missing half hexagons to your Grannies Paperweight….

half hexagon

 

Once you’ve crocheted the first four rounds of your Grannie’s Paperweight, it’s time to join it in to the half hexagon gap that the whole hexagons form along the top and bottom..

I’m using UK terminology  (however if you are more familiar with American patterns then a UK single crochet is an American double, and a UK double crochet is an American treble) …. and many apologies because this is a bit of a photo heavy post.

For joining in the fifth round I use a 3.25 mm crochet hook (I like the Brittany wooden ones as their point is nice and sharp and fits into the stitches without snagging up on them) and prefer a slightly finer tapestry yarn so the vintage brands like Penelope, and Coats are perfect (as is the Elsa Williams US brand, that’s so lovely it seems to work brilliantly for all the rounds)

 

chain 3

 

Make a slip knot, insert your hook into the bottom chain of your half hexagon, wrap the yarn round the hook, pull through the stitch of the hexagon and then through the stitch on the hook.  Chain 3.

 

joining in

 

Now insert the hook into the bottom corner of the hexagon to the right, bring the yarn over the hook, and scoop it through the gap, your hook will now be laying on the front of your work, pull the yarn through the stitch on your hook to secure it. Now make a dc into the top stitch of the half hexagon next to the chain of 3.  And then make another dc.

 

joining 1st segment

 

Now count along 3 of the dc in the hexagon to the right and in the gap between 3rd and 4th gap, insert the hook, bring the yarn through, then through the stitch on the hook to secure.

 

second segment

 

Now make 3 dc in the half hexagon, and again count along 3 of the dc in the hexagon you are joining it to, insert the hook between the 6th and 7th stitch, and again yarn over the hook, pull it through and then pull the yarn through the stitch on the hook.

 

insert hook

 

Make one more set of 3 dc in the half hexagon and then insert the hook into the corner gap of the hexagon you are joining in to, wrap the yarn around the hook and pull it up through the gap.

 

insert into second gap

 

Now insert the hook into the corner gap of the next hexagon that the half hexagon is being joined to, scoop up the yarn and pull it up through the gap.

 

yarn over

 

Bring the yarn through the stitch on the hook and now work 3 dc along the next side of your half hexagon.  (the first sc stitch you are working into is the same one you ended on along the previous side)

Join like before, insert the hook between the 3rd and 4th dc of the whole hexagon, pull the yarn through the gap and then through the stitch on the hook. Continue all the way around, joining the second corner the same way as you joined the first corner.

 

insert hook in last stitch

 

When you reach the bottom, make 3 dc like you have been doing through the tops of the sc, insert your hook into the bottom gap of the whole hexagon on the left, scoop the yarn and pull it through the gap,  and then through the stitch that is on the hook and make 1 chain.

 

finishing third side

 

Now you need to work a row of sc stitches along the raw edge of your work.

I find the pointy end of the Brittany hook makes this a lot easier than using a plastic crochet hook.

 

double crochet along edge

 

 

You want to work though the centre of the stitches that are formed by working the chains at either end or your groups of stitches.

 

 

carry on double crochet

 

I find I need to make about 18 sc along the raw edge (between 16 and 19, it depends a bit on the thickness of the wool and how stretchy it is…anymore than that and the side goes all bulgy like a fat little tummy)

 

slip stitch

 

When I come almost to the end, rather than make a sc as the last stitch, I insert the hook into the stitch that joins the half hexagon to the whole one, and pull the yarn though the stitch and then through the stitch on the hook (basically making a slip stitch) before cutting the yarn and pulling that through to cast off.

 

filled in gap

 

That then fills in the gap between your hexagons.  When I then sew in the tails (of which there are a never ending amount for this pattern) I try to avoid sewing them in along the finished edge because when you then come to crocheting an edging or border, it becomes a bit harder to insert the hook.

If, at first, this row looks a bit lumpy and bumpy, it’s not a stress to unravel it and crochet it again.  (besides, once the border edging is worked that helps smooths out any unsightly odd bits)

 

 

 

 

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